the editing room



While editing my 16mm workprint a couple weeks ago to project for a preview screening, I at first found it slow and challenging.  It had been a while since I edited actual film with a razor blade and tape.  Because of the time it takes to separate and string together shots, hang them on the wall, hand crank the reels, it can make for a different style of editing.  Often times less cuts.

After I was all finished, I thought it might be an OK edit.  I quickly edited together 18 minutes of my band's jam recordings mixed with some field recordings to play along with the footage, not in complete sync with the edit, as I had no way to sync them up.  This audio-visual edit is basically a really rough edit of the beginning of my movie.

I had already done an edit of this section of the movie digitally, a more compicated edit.  I thought it was going to be the better of the two.  But after comparing them, I like the simple edit I did with my workprint way more, and the way the audio goes with it too.  I was really surprised by this.  It just feels fresher I think.  It was less thought out, and I was under pressure to get it done quickly.  So I'm now going back to my digital edit and conforming it to what I did with my workprint.

this project on fb: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hangs-Upon-Nothing-a-16mm-surf-film/246361802068338